Skip over navigation
Donate

bullying-awareness

Bullying hurts, but there is a lot that can be done about it. Kids Help Phone wants to make it easy for YOU to help, whether you are a young person, a teacher, a coach, a parent, or another supportive adult in kids’ lives.

If you are looking for ways to support Bullying Awareness Week, if you want to learn more or find ways to take action, or if you are affected by bullying and need help – there’s something here for you!

Get Informed - bullying information and statistics
Show Your Support - help Kids Help Phone make a difference
Take Action - what you can do to support Bullying Awareness Week
Get Help - resources to deal with bullying
What’s Happening - Bullying Awareness Week events
Learn More - Kids Help Phone’s thought leadership on the issue

If you are a member of the media looking to contact Kids Help Phone about Bullying Awareness Week, please call Elizabeth Alice Worth at (416) 581-8955 or liz.worth@kidshelpphone.ca.

DONATE NOW

Donating to Kids Help Phone is a great way to help young people dealing with bullying, ensuring that help and hope is always available 24/7/365.

Tip Sheets

From Kids Help Phone:

Bullying: Kids

Bullying: Teens

Bullying: Adults

Cyberbullying: Kids

Cyberbullying: Teens

Cyberbullying: Adults

From the National Aboriginal Health Organization:

Bullying: Youth

Bullying: Teachers

Bullying: Parents

Videos for sharing:

"Washroom" PSA

Words of Hurt and Healing

Monster Jam driver Cam McQueen talks about bullying

Get Informed

Bullying happens every day, and can cause a lot of pain. A child or teen who is bullied may be repeatedly hurt, excluded, picked on, or humiliated – and feel so alone. Witnesses may be affected too, scared and helpless. Kids who bully may be experiencing their own problems, and many kids both bully and are bullied themselves. Unfortunately, about half of the time, kids do not tell an adult when they’ve been bullied.

Did you know?

  • A 2011 Kids Help Phone survey asked kids if they had been cyberbullied: 65% said yes.1
  • 86% of Canadian teachers feel bullying and violence are serious problems in public schools.2
  • Approximately 10% of the contacts that Kids Help Phone receives from young people relate to bullying.3
  • In Canada, a child or teen is bullied every seven minutes on the playground.4
  • More than 50% of the time, bullying stops when a bystander intervenes.5
  • The best way to stop bullying is to prevent it. Working to promote environments based on respect and empathy, and reaching out and being inclusive of others, are great ways to stop bullying from happening in the first place.

If you are a young person in need of support with bullying (whether you are experiencing bullying yourself or as a bystander, or even if you are bullying yourself), check out our Get Help section below. This section also has resources for parents, teachers, and other adults who want to support young people dealing with bullying.

You can learn even more about bullying on our Kids and Teens websites, or in the Learn More section below.

Sources:

  1. Knighton, L., Simon, A., Kelly, J., and Kimball, A. (2012), Cyberbullying: Reality check (Kids Help Phone Research Update), 10. Retrieved from http://org.kidshelpphone.ca/media/80712/2012-cir-cyberbullying.pdf
  2. Taillefer, P. (May 14, 2012). Remarks published in the proceedings from the Canadian Teachers’ Federation presentation to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights on Cyberbullying.
  3. Kids Help Phone (2013).
  4. Bullying.org Where You Are Not Alone. (n.d.). Bullying Basics. Retrieved from http://www.bullying.org/htm/main.cfm?content=1084
  5. Craig, W. M. & Pepler, D. (1997). "Observations of Bullying and Victimization in the School Yard". Canadian Journal of School of Psychology, 13(2): 41-60.

Back to top

Show Your Support

Ensuring that young people have a trusted, 24/7 source of support is a great way to help with bullying. When you donate to Kids Help Phone, you can ensure a professional counsellor is available for every kid, teen, and young adult who contacts us looking for help and hope. Donate now.

Support Kids Help Phone’s supporters

A number of caring companies are joining with Kids Help Phone for Bullying Awareness Week. Here are more ways you can support Kids Help Phone:

Monster Jam

Kids Help Phone is proud to work in partnership with the 2014 Maple Leaf Monster Jam Tour, encouraging youth, parents and other caring adults to Shift Gears. Stand Up. Stop Bullying. Look for opportunities to support Kids Help Phone at one of seven Monster Jam shows across Canada, starting in January. For more information about the Maple Leaf Monster Jam Tour, please visit monsterjamcanada.ca.

Mucho Burrito

Mucho Burrito, Canada’s new alternative to Mexican food, wants to encourage families to Grab Bullying by the Horns! Through the month of November, make a $1 donation to Kids Help Phone in-store and receive a coupon for a free Churro with entrée purchase on your next visit. And on November 22, Mucho Burrito will donate $1 to Kids Help Phone from every burrito sold in-store - so you can enjoy Mucho Burrito’s made-to-order gourmet Mexican food, and support Kids Help Phone at the same time! Find a Mucho Burrito location near you.

Back to top

Take Action

In this section, you’ll learn how to host a bullying awareness event in support of Kids Help Phone, how to promote Bullying Awareness Week using our online tools, and how to order Kids Help Phone awareness materials. Plus, take a stand by sharing our cyberbullying call to action!

Host an Event

Kids Help Phone is only able to offer its day and night professional counselling to young people thanks to the generous support of many people across Canada who raise funds to support our service. If you’re planning to host an event in support of Kids Help Phone for Bullying Awareness Week, email us today: baw-ssi@kidshelpphone.ca

Order Materials

Kids Help Phone’s youth campaign materials are available to schools and youth-serving agencies across Canada. They are available free of charge and can be ordered online at kidshelpphone.ca/materials thanks to the generous support of our donors. If you would like to make a contribution to support Kids Help Phone in providing materials such as this, please visit our donation page.

Take a Stand Against Cyberbullying

This November, Kids Help Phone is asking everyone in Canada to stand up to cyberbullying! Share this message online any way you like – through social media, your website, blog, or email signature – and ask everyone you know to do the same:

This Bullying Awareness Week, take a stand against cyberbullying. Pause before your post. Report hurtful comments. Promote respect. #BAW13

Share this message on Twitter and Facebook

Online Tools – Get social!

Change your profile pictures, headers, and backgrounds with these Bullying Awareness Week templates from Kids Help Phone:

Click on an image to automatically download it.

Facebook/Twitter Profile Pic

Facebook Cover Photo

Twitter Header Background

Show that you support Bullying Awareness Week by sharing these graphics, and encourage others to do the same.

Plus LIKE Kids Help Phone on Facebook (facebook.com/kidshelpphone) and FOLLOW us on Twitter (@kidshelpphone) to keep up to date with all of our Bullying Awareness Week activities and initiatives.

We’ll also be sharing tips, statistics, and news stories related to bullying, so be sure to share, like, and retweet us often during Bullying Awareness Week.

You can also check out our YouTube channel and share our videos with your friends, family, or school.

Back to top

Get Help

Need help now?

If you are a young person and need help with questions about bullying, big or small, contact a Kids Help Phone professional counsellor today at www.kidshelpphone.ca or 1-800-668-6868. We’re free, anonymous, and confidential, and always there, 24/7.

At kidshelpphone.ca, kids and teens can find instant access to expert-vetted information, tips, and tools about bullying and cyberbullying. Parents, educators, and other caring adults can also benefit from getting to know these resources. Why not sit down with the young people in your life and visit them together?

Here are some highlights to check out:

  • The Bullying Info Booth for teens and for kids 8 to 11 has information for young people who have been bullied, have witnessed bullying or have engaged in bullying themselves.
  • The Cyberbullying Info Booth for teens helps you learn more about cyberbullying, what to do if it happens to you, how to stop doing it, and what to do if you are a bystander. It also contains videos to teach you how to protect your privacy on Facebook.
  • How to Block Cyberbullies explains how to block unwanted messages online.
  • Feeling Forensics for young people ages 8 to 11 helps kids practice identifying emotions, a building block in developing empathy for others.
  • The Safety Planner was built with bullied youth in mind who are not yet ready to reach out for help.
  • Check out our new bullying and cyberbullying tipsheets for kids, teens and adults. These sharable, printable tip sheets are valuable resources for anyone looking for practical assistance in dealing with bullying.
  • Did you know Kids Help Phone has an app? Always There connects young people to counselling and resources at the touch of a button. Updated in time for Bullying Awareness Week with bullying-related content in the Info Booth, Always There is one of the many ways Kids Help Phone is supporting young people when and how they need it most. Download it here.
  • The I Want to Stop Bullying workbook is a great exercise for young people who bully and want to find ways to improve their relationships with other young people.
  • TVOKids (Ontario) Bullying Awareness Week special episode: On Monday, November 18, Ontario residents can tune into TVOKids when they premier their new series It Matters, as well as a new music video, “S.T.O.P. a Bully.” Visit http://www.tvokids.com/shows/tvokidshelpzone to learn more.

Facebook develops new bullying resource

Kids Help Phone, together with more than 25 other organizations, has partnered with Facebook to provide input into its new Bullying Resource Centre. Developed with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, this online hub features valuable tips, tools, and information for parents, educators and teens, and a dedicated online community where parents can discuss bullying. Check it out!

Back to top

What’s Happening

Check out these key events that Kids Help Phone is participating in for Bullying Awareness week. Our activities include:

  • November 8: The International Stop Cyberbullying Youth Summit in Charlottetown, PEI. Run by youth leaders, with invited experts, policymakers, and industry (such as Microsoft, Google, and Facebook) attending, the UN-style summit aims to create an action plan to address cyberbullying. Alisa Simon, Kids Help Phone’s VP of Counselling Services and Programs, will be facilitating a breakout session. For more information or to register as a youth or adult participant, visit http://youthsummit.stopcyberbullying.org/.
  • On November 20, Jeunesse, J'écoute is holding a celebration and launch event (for Live Chat, the Toujours á l’écoute app, and Proof Positive highlights) at our Quebec regional office for our donors, corporate partners and supporters and media. For more information, contact deborah.jussome@jeunessejecoute.ca.
  • Also on November 20, Kids Help Phone will be participating in the Define the Line cyberbullying conference at McGill University, led by our board member Dr. Shaheen Shariff. Kids Help Phone’s Director of French Language Services, Alain Johnson, and President and CEO Sharon Wood will also be speaking at the event.

Back to top

Learn More

Kids Help Phone doesn’t just work hard to help young people and adults to deal with bullying. We also strive to effect change on a societal level, ensuring that young people’s voices and needs are taken into consideration in public policies and debate on issues relating to bullying and cyberbullying.

Here are some recent examples, where you can learn more about our work on these issues:

  • Our 2012 Impact Report, Caring for the Future, summarizes how we are working on behalf of kids on the national and global stage. The Advocate section summarizes Kids Help Phone’s recent thought leadership on cyberbullying.
  • Cyberbullying: Reality Check, is our 2012 critical issues report that shares young people’s experiences with cyberbullying and offers recommendations on what adults can do to support them as they navigate an increasingly technologically mediated social reality.
  • Read our Factum of the Intervener, Kids Help Phone’s written submission in a landmark 2012 cyberbullying case before the Supreme Court.
  • In 2012, we also made a submission to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights’ on Cyberbullying in Canada and a submission to the Government of Ontario’s Standing Committee on Social Policy regarding Bills 13 and 14 (which became the Accepting Schools Act).

Back to top

With thanks to The Ontario Ministry of Education and all of our other donors for their generous support of Kids Help Phone’s work. Together we are making an important difference supporting young people across Canada affected by bullying and cyberbullying.

Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead. Brenda called Kid's Help Phone to vent about her parents. She said they were being unreasonable by not allowing her to meet a boy. The 15-year-old was considering sneaking out anyway. A few questions revealed that the boy was someone she'd "met" on the Internet – and that he'd first said he was 15, but was actually 29. The KHP counselor talked about Brenda's natural curiosity, but also about possible dangers. It didn't take long for Brenda to admit to having "funny feelings" about it. By the end of the call, she'd decided to try to find someone her own age, met the "old-fashioned" way. Mike told us he was traveling fast on the road to nowhere. He wanted to get off drugs and off the streets. The KHP counselor calmed Mike, assessed his needs, and found him a safe shelter. Years later, Mike called again. Now 20, he was back in school, with a steady job and a new life. He was calling to say thanks – not just for what KHP had done, but most of all for listening to him and believing in him. Mike says KHP helped him turn his life around. Today, he spends his spare time helping street youth. Ten-year-old Megan was being sexually and physically abused. Two nights earlier, she'd been placed in a foster home, but didn't feel comfortable talking to her foster parents yet. With gentle prompting, Megan began to tell her story. Her feelings were agonizingly mixed. Despite everything, she missed her mom's bedtime stories and the familiarity of home. It meant a lot to be able to talk about her feelings with someone she could trust. Together, Megan and KHP looked at what Megan could do to make things easier, like getting bedtime stories on tape. She was grateful to be reminded that her foster home would become more familiar each day, and that KHP would be there whenever she needed it in the days ahead.